Calling All Bloggers: Bustle Is Hiring Part-Time, Work-From-Home Writers

October 13, 2016
by Carson Kohler
Junior Writer
Work from home writing jobs

Bustle describes itself as “the destination for millennial women,” citing a total of 50 million readers across the world.

And I totally get why. The website offers fun and clickable content.

I’ll admit I totally clicked the headline “We Tried Using Red Lipstick To Cover Dark Circles” because, as of late, I’m plagued with the look.

But before you get sucked into reading stories about “Stranger Things” theories and Harry Potter subscription boxes (links later), read this: Bustle is seeking part-time, work-from-home fashion and beauty identities writers and news and politics writers.

Interested in getting your writing in front of the eyeballs of millions of readers? Read on, my friends.

Write Part-Time for Bustle about Fashion and Beauty

Consider yourself a fashionista? Unfortunately I don’t. But if you’ve totally got that brow look down or are constantly Instagramming those edgy shoes no one else has yet, this position might be for you.

Bustle needs someone to cover mainstream fashion and beauty news — especially within more marginalized communities. Think: POC, LGBTQ, plus-size, body positive perspectives

From the listing: “If you had opinions on Barbie’s three new body types, Syro’s heels for masculine humans, or SmartGlamour’s inclusive NYFW show, we want your voice on our site.”

The gig is very part-time, perfect for students, moms or full-time workers. You should be able to work six-hour shifts for at least two days a week between Sunday and Thursday. (Whoo, free weekends!)

Requirements are straightforward: Have a passion for fashion and beauty, a strong Bustle-like voice, fun ideas and two-plus years of editorial experience (although personal blogs totally count).

Breaking news shouldn’t stress you out, as you might be asked to cover a story at the drop of a pin (like fashion design, sewing stuff… get it?).

For details about how to apply, see below.

Write Part-Time for Bustle about News and Politics

For me, this one seems a little scarier — but perhaps it’ll be less so after this darn election is over.

Bustle needs part-time experienced news and politics writers and reporters who know how to handle original reporting, but also can turn around quick, breaking news content. (Most recently? Trump scandals.)

Topics you might get your typing fingers on include politics, women’s issues, national and global news, health, technology, science and crime.

For this position, you should be able to commit at least three days to Bustle, though if the news is really churning, you might be needed four to five days.

The barrier to entry is a bit higher: Bustle wants someone who has a journalism or communications degree (or something of that nature) and should have two years of reporting, writing and/or blogging experience.

You should know how to pitch a solid news story and have a strong Bustle-like voice.

Interested in Writing for Bustle?

The application process for each of these writing gigs is the same. But don’t expect to speed through it — I suggest you take some time.

You’ll want to have a polished cover letter and resume and active personal social media accounts. (So update your dusty LinkedIn profile!)

Bustle also wants to see you pitch two feature stories (essays, editorials, original reporting, roundups, or something similar) for your chosen beat — fashion and beauty identities or news and politics in this case.

You should also provide three work samples — any previously published works will do.

Apply for both the fashion and beauty identities gig or the news and politics gig online. 

OK. Now you have my permission to read up on “Stranger Things” and that Harry Potter subscription box.

Then visit our Facebook jobs page to find more job openings.

Your Turn: Will you apply for these work-from-home writing jobs?

Carson Kohler (@CarsonKohler) is a junior writer at The Penny Hoarder. After recently completing graduate school, she focuses on saving money — and surviving the move back in with her parents.

by Carson Kohler
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

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