These Seasonal Jobs Will Pay You to Work With Huskies in Alaska All Summer

Updated November 8, 2016
by Carson Kohler
Junior Writer
seasonal job

“Preferred candidate will like dogs…”

Hello, dream job!

I like dogs. I have two — a Boston terrier and a rescue mutt. I Snapchat their faces way too much.

Before I left for work this morning, I told them goodbye in an embarrassing baby-talk voice — all paired with a pat on the head and a kiss on the nose.

Therefore, I meet one of the qualifications to work at Husky Homestead, an Alaskan retreat that offers visitors an inside look at sled dogs and puppies. And it’s hiring for next summer.

More About Husky Homestead

Husky Homestead is the home of Jeff King, four-time champion of the Iditarod. That’s the annual sled race across the state of Alaska — more than 1,150 miles.

“In 1993, Jeff King broke all previous records, finishing in 10 days, 15 hours, 38 minutes, 15 seconds,” Iditarod’s website reports. Insane.

It all started in 1975, when King moved to Alaska simply looking for adventure. With plenty of championships to his name, he now opens up his Husky Homestead home to visitors in the summer to reveal the making of championship pups.

“Cuddle a puppy upon arrival,” the website states. Then get an inside, behind-the-scenes look at the operation, including a 50-foot Husky treadmill used to train them.

3 Open Positions For “Paw-some” Puppy-Lovers

Does this place sound like heaven?

Husky Homestead is looking to fill three positions for next summer’s season, which runs early May to mid- to late September.

Become a Husky Homestead Reservations Agent

In this position, you’ll be answering phones and responding to questions, making reservations and coordinating tours.

You should be proficient with Microsoft Excel, Word and Outlook. Legible handwriting is required. (You’ll be asked to submit a sample.)

You’ll be paid $12/hour and earn a bonus of $1/hour after completing the terms of your signed contract.

On-site housing is available, and rent (varying by accommodations) is automatically deducted from your paycheck.

Become a Husky Homestead Driver/Guide

Unfortunately (or fortunately), you will not be a sled driver. However, you’ll pick up guests in a passenger bus and help guide and manager tour groups of up to 100 folks.

Occasionally, you’ll assist with kennel chores (yes!), including cleaning, feeding and getting water for 30 to 40 huskies.

You must be at least 21, have a Class C commercial driver’s license and a safe driving record. You should also be outgoing, as you’ll work directly with guests. A knowledge of the surrounding area and mushing is preferred.

Pay is $15/hour with a $1/hour bonus upon contract completion.

On-site housing is available, and rent (varying by accommodations) is automatically deducted from your paycheck.

Become a Husky Homestead Photographer/Yard Staff

You’ll greet guests with puppies! And take photos of the guests playing with the little furballs.

After, you’ll use a computer to download, edit and print photos for guest to purchase at the end of the tour.

The yard staff portion of the position requires you to clean the tour building and restock merch.

You must be at least 18 and have an outgoing personality — customer service skills are key. You might work 4-hour or 12-hours days; just be flexible.

Hourly pay starts at $12, plus that $1/hour bonus when you complete your contract.

Housing is available, and rent (varying by accommodations) is automatically deducted from your paycheck.

How to Apply to Work With Puppies at Husky Homestead

To learn more about any of the above positions, check out Husky Homestead’s employment page.

If you’re interested, applying is easy. Email your resume and cover letter with three professional and two personal references to info@huskyhomestead.com.

If you want to find more awesome job opportunities like this one, check out our Facebook jobs page.

Your Turn: No plans next summer? Are you applying?

Carson Kohler (@CarsonKohler) is a junior writer at The Penny Hoarder. After recently completing graduate school, she focuses on saving money — and surviving the move back in with her parents.

by Carson Kohler
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

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