How to Make Money

Love Working With People? 10 Fantastic Side Jobs for Extroverts

June 4, 2015
by Jennifer Parris
Contributor
jobs for extroverts

If you’re an outgoing person on the hunt for a side job, it’s important to find one that fits your naturally sociable personality. Spending additional time on work, when your schedule may already be full (or overloaded!) is exhausting, unless you find an enjoyable way to bring in more income.

Whether you’re already working full-time, raising children or looking for a bit of extra income in retirement, finding a side job that actually plays to your extroverted tendencies will make this extra work much more pleasant, and perhaps even fulfilling. We’ve put together a mix of work-from-home, flexible schedule, part-time and freelance opportunities that require an extrovert’s natural knack for working with people. Here are 10 great jobs for extroverts.

1. Casino Dealer

Roll the dice to land this fun part-time job! You’ll provide professional yet personable customer service as you shuffle the cards, issue chips and take winning and losing wagers according to company policy.

But do you have what it takes to be a casino dealer? Steve Gillman, who worked as a part-time casino dealer for 10 years, recommends thinking about the work environment. You’ll spend most of each shift standing, and some games require more skill than others.

“Poker, for example, involves keeping track of many players and several rounds of betting. Craps is such a fast-paced, high-energy (and high-stress) game that I quit before I even finished training,” says Gillman.

2. Brand Ambassador

In addition to getting the company’s message out there to increase brand visibility, as a brand ambassador, you need to live and breathe it You might get to host company events as well as engage the public about your company’s products and services. Depending on the brand, you may be working at a college campus, a local bar, a country club or a trade show.

It’s your job to interact with potential customers and the general public to help spread awareness about your brand and the product or service it offers, and to generate sales opportunities. You may host fun activities and giveaways, give out coupons or offer free samples. When you’re not at events, you’ll spend some time helping to coordinate and plan future events.

3. Tutor

Possessing a passion for teaching is a must to be a tutor. You’ll need to have superior reading, spelling and comprehension skills (plus a whole lot of patience) as you teach children in a variety of subjects.

You’ll usually require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, and depending on the subject(s) you tutor, you may need a specific degree. For example, tutoring in science fields like biology or chemistry would require at least a bachelor’s degree in those areas. Reading comprehension tutoring jobs may require an English or education degree.

However, even high school or college students may be able to tutor very young children, or student who’ve just taken the PSAT or SAT may be able to tutor those preparing for it.

4. Product Demonstrator

If you like to show off (doing demonstrations, that is!), then being a product demonstrator would be ideal for you. You’ve probably seen food demonstrators in grocery stores, who set up a small display, cook relatively simple dishes related to their company’s products and offer free samples and advice to shoppers. You’ll need to have an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the products you’re demonstrating, plus a knack for salesmanship.

“If there’s a lull in customers, don’t succumb to the urge to sit down or pull out your phone; tidy up your area if necessary and strike up conversations with people passing by,” advises Charlotte Edwards, who wrote about product demonstration jobs for the Penny Hoarder. “Future work may be dependent on the number of products that people buy during your shift, which might be the motivation you need to chat with strangers instead of checking Facebook!”

5. Bike Tour Guide

Put the pedal to the, well, bike trail as a bike tour guide. You’ll need to be physically fit, as you might have to bike about 20-60 miles each and every day.

Depending on the company you work for, you’ll need to know certain bike routes, be knowledgeable about interesting landmarks and tourist attractions, and obey local bike laws. You may need to have certification in CPR and basic first aid, and be able to perform basic bike maintenance as well.

6. Kayak Instructor

Share your love of little boats by becoming a kayak instructor! For this position, you should have a passion for the environment and inspire others to engage in outdoor activities. You’ll need first aid and CPR certification, along with the ability to teach others in a calm manner and perform administrative duties connected with class instruction.

7. Photographer

As a photographer, you might find yourself shooting lifestyle images one day, private corporate events the next. Some photographers specialize and others generalize, so think about what your skills and interests might lead you to do, as well as the photography market in your area.

You’ll need experience and in most cases a bachelor’s degree to work professionally. In addition to lighting and shooting images, you should be adept at photo editing and retouching.

One particular type of photography may be the perfect side job: taking holiday family portraits. Susan Shain, an amateur photographer who makes money on the side this way, says marketing is the key to success.

“If you’re interested in taking family photographs, start by reaching out to friends whose families are going to be home for the holidays. (Working for friends has an added bonus: everyone is more comfortable around people they know, which means they’ll photograph better.) Then tell your entire network you’re offering this service, and ask them to help you spread the word. If they know of anyone who might be interested, call up those potential clients yourself. Don’t wait for business to come to you.”

8. Veterinary Specialist

The main priority of a veterinary technician is ensuring all pets receive quality medical care. You’ll educate clients on all aspects of pet health (including preventive care, pet health needs, hospital services and other issues), and be proactive about maintaining a safe and effective hospital environment. You must be confident around all types of pets, be physically capable of the demands of the position and have certification from a NAVTA-approved veterinary assistant program.

9. Event Planner

Every event planner wants to plan and execute the perfect soiree or corporate retreat. Researching event sites, overnight accommodations, catering, transportation and recreational activities and entertainment are just a few of the many tasks you’ll oversee. You’ll also stay on site during the event to make sure everything goes smoothly.

For this job, you’ll need to have business experience, an eye for design, experience in conference and party planning, and an impeccable knack for communicating effectively with clients.

Because event planning is such a popular, and therefore competitive, business, you may want to consider becoming a Certified Special Events Professional or CSEP, which may help you command a higher rate.

10. Hotel Concierge

Whether you’re getting your guests extra-fluffy towels or arranging a spectacular night on the town, it’s all in a day’s work for a concierge. You’ll need to possess an encyclopedic knowledge of your area and local attractions. Coordinating requests and treating everyone like a VIP is part and parcel of this job. Experience working in the hotel industry is a plus, along with strong organizational skills.

If you love working with people (but also want work flexibility), start your search to find a flexible side job that can give you the best of both worlds!

Your Turn: Have you found a side job that works well with your natural extroversion? We’d love to hear about it!

Jennifer Parris is a Career Writer for FlexJobs, an award-winning service that helps job-seekers find professional opportunities that offer work flexibility, such as telecommuting, freelance, part-time or alternative schedules. To learn more about Jennifer, visit FlexJobs.com or tweet @flexjobs.

by Jennifer Parris
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

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