Feel Burned by Eclipse Glasses From Amazon? Keep Your Eyes on This Lawsuit

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Kayla Boyer, left, and Alexis Corder wear protective glasses to watch a partial solar eclipse at St. Petersburg College on Monday August 21, 2017.
Kayla Boyer, left, and Alexis Corder wear protective glasses to watch the partial solar eclipse at St. Petersburg College on Monday August 21, 2017. Sharon Steinmann/The Penny Hoarder

Did you think solar eclipse madness was over? You were so, so wrong.

A couple in South Carolina has filed a lawsuit against Amazon. The couple says they used a three-pack of eclipse glasses they purchased on Amazon to view the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. The suit says that after they used the glasses, they both started getting headaches and watery eyes.

After those initial symptoms, they started to experience blurry vision and dark spots in their lines of vision, the lawsuit claims.

The suit accuses Amazon of unfair trade practices, negligence and breach of warranty, among other claims.

Amazon’s Attention to Counterfeits: Too Little, Too Late?

Amazon announced on Aug. 13, a week ahead of the eclipse, that potentially counterfeit glasses were for sale in its marketplace. At that time, Amazon said it was removing potentially dangerous glasses from its listings.

According to the suit, Amazon released a recall notice for identified counterfeit eclipse glasses that didn’t meet safe viewing standards on Aug. 19, just two days before the countrywide event. The plaintiffs claim they did not receive a recall notice from Amazon.

Cities across South Carolina drew large crowds because much of the state was in the path of the eclipse’s totality.

We reached out to Amazon, but a representative said the company doesn’t comment on litigation.

Lisa Rowan is a writer and producer at The Penny Hoarder.