These “Best Value Colleges” Help You Graduate With Less Than $10K in Debt

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These “Best Value Colleges” Help You Graduate With Less Than $10K in Debt
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When best college lists roll around each year, we expect to see the usual suspects: all the Ivy League schools, plus Duke, which always seems to sneak in there.

So when Kiplinger released its Best College Values list, we took a look on the far right side of the rubric: average debt at graduation. Because you can go to your Swarthmores or your Vanderbilts, sure. But according to Kiplinger’s latest tally, the average debt for students graduating from those top-tier schools easily reaches the $20,000-or-more mark.

Which Schools’ Graduates Have the Lowest Student Debt?

Wondering where you can get a solid education and perhaps graduate without mountains of debt? Only three schools on Kiplinger’s Best College Values list reported that students averaged less than $10,000 at graduation.

118. Baruch College of the City University of New York, New York

  • Cost per year: $35,790
  • Average debt at graduation: $7,915
  • Admissions rate: 32%

3. Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

  • Cost per year: $61,140
  • Average debt at graduation: $8,577
  • Does not give merit-based aid
  • Admissions rate: 7%

73. Berea College, Berea, Kentucky

  • Cost per year: $7,742
  • Average debt at graduation: $7,928
  • Does not give merit-based aid
  • Admissions rate: 36%

The catch: Berea is a liberal arts work college, meaning all students work at least 10 hours per week on campus in exchange for four years of tuition. Students only pay room and board costs.

That’s it, kids. Those are your options if you’re searching for schools schools on Kiplinger’s Best College Values list where students average less than $10,000 in student loan debt at graduation. Better start applying for scholarships.

Your Turn: How would you decide which college to attend?

Lisa Rowan is a writer and producer at The Penny Hoarder. She has a B.A. from the University of Maryland.