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Have Diabetic Nerve Pain? Clinical Trials Could Help (Some Studies Pay up to $300!)

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Young woman is measuring blood sugar level and using mobile phone.
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The first sign of diabetic nerve damage is a weird “pins and needles” sensation. It’s like the tingling feeling you get when your arm or leg falls asleep. After the mysterious tingling, the next thing to come is a burning sensation.

Then the real pain starts.

If you have Type 2 diabetes and nerve pain, here’s a clinical trial you might be interested in. It’s being run by Acurian, one of the largest recruiters for clinical trials in the world and a trusted name in the industry.

Nerve pain is a common complication of diabetes, says the American Diabetes Association. About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes suffer from painful nerve damage, typically in their legs and feet.

Contribute to Medical Research and Also Get Paid

Researchers sometimes use clinical drug trials to test treatments for various ailments. So you can contribute to the advancement of medicine and get paid.

People who qualify for this research study may receive payment up to $300, as well as study-related medical care and medication at no cost.

To qualify, you must:

  • Be between 18 and 70 years old.
  • Have a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.
  • Be treating it with medication.
  • Have a diagnosis or symptoms of diabetic nerve pain.
  • Be otherwise healthy.

We don’t have a lot of other details about this particular clinical trial — this is common, because researchers don’t release details to those who don’t qualify.

Find out if you qualify for the study here by answering a number of questions about yourself and your medical history.

Diabetic nerve pain is caused by high blood sugar levels, which injure nerve fibers. This study focuses on peripheral neuropathy. That typically causes pain and numbness in your feet and legs, followed by your hands and arms, according to Mayo Clinic.

No cure exists.

Mike Brassfield ([email protected]) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

 

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