Work Abroad: New Zealand’s Recruiting People With a Free, Week-Long Trip

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work abroad
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Would you move to another country for a new job?

For lots of us, the immediate answer would be no. We’d miss our friends, family and our cornhole team that’s been on a winning streak all year.

But if you’re up for an adventure, you might want to check out the job market in these two beautiful locations.

1. Score a Free Trip to New Zealand

A collective of companies in Wellington, New Zealand have put out a worldwide call to fill scores of job openings, including digital strategists, creative directors and software developers.

“The city will host 100 candidates for a free weeklong trip where techies can participate in job interviews and get to know New Zealand. The trip will include pre-arranged job interviews, meet-ups with others in the tech industry and trips around Wellington,” Time reports.

If you’re open to moving to New Zealand for work, but don’t know much — or anything — about the area, this is a commitment-free way to see if it’s a good fit.

To get in on this opportunity, head over to the City of Wellington’s website and register for a free Looksee Wellington account.

If you’re nominated by prospective employers, you’ll be flown over to spend a week getting to know the location and the companies interested in hiring you.

If you land a job, the cost of living is roughly the same as some medium-to-large U.S. cities.

  • Fast food combo meal: $8
  • 16-ounce domestic beer from a market: $4.05
  • 2-liter bottle Coca-Cola: $2.47
  • Monthly rent, 480-square-foot furnished studio: $1,022
  • Monthly utilities for one person (heating, electric, gas): $99
  • 2 movie tickets: $17
  • Pub dinner for two: $36

Wellington is known for its abundance of live music and beautiful waterfront scenery, so you won’t be bored on your days off.  

2. Help Correct Denmark’s Labor Shortage

Work abroad

A cyclist travels down a busy street in Copenhagen, Denmark. LeoPatrizi/Getty Images

Companies all over Denmark are reporting severe challenges in filling job openings with local workers.

That doesn’t sound very cozy — or “hygge,” as the locals call it.

“More than a third of companies in this industrial and technically advanced nation can no longer recruit enough skilled workers to fill posts. Vacancies abound for I.T. specialists, computer scientists, engineers and mechanics, as well as for electricians and carpenters,” notes the New York Times.  

In response, several companies are pulling together to recruit workers from overseas to fill the gaps.

Large corporations like Microsoft are targeting job seekers around the world, but plenty of smaller companies have openings as well.

If the idea of living in the country that invented Legos appeals to you, stop by Work In Denmark’s website and set up a profile.

The Times says employee wages are going up in Denmark to lure new workers to the area. That’s good, because the cost of living is a little higher than some U.S.-based workers may be used to.

  • Fast food combo meal: $10
  • 16-ounce domestic beer from a market: $1.64
  • 2-liter bottle Coca-Cola: $2.99
  • Monthly rent, 480-square-foot furnished studio: $900
  • Monthly utilities for one person (heating, electric, gas): $185
  • 2 movie tickets: $29
  • Pub dinner for two: $66

If you move to Denmark, you’ll want to get familiar with its customs and traditions right away — beginning with bicycle culture.

Your turn: Would you work abroad in New Zealand or Denmark?

Lisa McGreevy is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. If its CEO ever decides to open a satellite office, she’d move to either place instantly. Follower her on Twitter @lisah

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