How to Make Money

Calling All Designers: Create a Better Medical Bill and Win $5K

July 9, 2016
by Carson Kohler
Contributor

Every time I look at a medical bill, I wish it read more like a Target receipt: item, cost, money saved with my RedCard.

Why can’t it be that simple?

I’m not the only one who feels this way — nearly two-thirds of patients find their medical bills confusing, according to a study from Mad*Pow.

That’s why the design agency is holding a national contest to redesign medical bills.

Could You Create “A Bill You Can Understand”?

The AARP-sponsored national competition aims to solve this problem by seeking out new ways to design medical bills and ultimately creating “A Bill You Can Understand.”

Designs will be judged in two categories: understandability and most transformational. The winner in each category will take home $5,000.

And even better, your design can have a real impact.

Six health care providers that cater to about 10 million patients annually have agreed to review and possibly implement the new bills, according to Healthcare Daily Online.

How to Enter This Design Contest

The challenge isn’t limited to professional designers — anyone with a good idea can enter.

Your submission must contain several elements: A written design proof (less than 2,250 words), a three-minute video, visual compositions and a journey map.

Visit abillyoucanunderstand.com to pre-register.

Then study all of the provided resources, including a research report that illuminates patients’ biggest headaches, to help inspire your design.

Submit your entry by August 10.

Judges will announce the winners at the 10th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference, held September 25-28, 2016, in Santa Clara, California.

I’m no designer, so I don’t actually know if designing your medical-bill submission so it’s laid out like a Target receipt is a good idea. But if you try that and it wins, a cut of the prize would be nice…

You Turn: What’s your biggest headache when studying your medical bill?

Carson Kohler (@CarsonKohler) is a junior writer at The Penny Hoarder. After recently completing graduate school, she focuses on saving money — and surviving the move back in with her parents.

by Carson Kohler
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

Share Your Thoughts

Top Articles