How to Make Money

8 Summer Jobs for Teachers: How to Make Extra Money When School’s Out

Updated August 22, 2016
by Angie Nelson
Contributor
summer jobs for teachers

While many of us dream of having the summer months off, some teachers prefer to use their vacations to earn some extra cash.

Working during the summer can help you keep your teaching skills sharp, and you may even learn a few new things — preferably with someone else footing the bill.

You will find no shortage of summer jobs for teachers or educators. Many of these opportunities will give you some summer flexibility and a modest income without a lengthy commitment. When the summer’s over, you can resume your day job without having to worry about quitting or keeping a now-second job.

Ready to find your new summer job?

Teach in a Different Setting

1. Teach English as a Second Language

Want to strengthen your teaching skills while earning some extra money? Look for opportunities to tutor ESL students both locally and online.

Look for large corporations in your area that may relocate foreign employees to your city, and inquire whether they need a freelance ESL tutor to help their staff brush up on their language skills. Or go online and connect with students all over the world through sites like GoFluent and ISUS.

Vernetta R. Freeney, founder of Women are Gamechangers and a teacher at a local college in Houston, found ESL tutoring was more than just making extra money. “I was given an outside perspective on how business operated in countries around the world,” she says. “Needless to say I learned probably as much, if not more, from the students I taught than what I provided to them. Plus, the pay was great and it was a flexible schedule.

2. Teach Abroad

Why limit your summer job search to the U.S.? You’ll find many great opportunities for teachers to work abroad during the summer months. “Qualified and experienced teachers are highly in demand at schools and organizations abroad (especially those in developing countries),” says Jessie from GoOverseas.com.

While paid short-term positions can be hard to come by, volunteer programs, especially those teaching English, are plentiful in certain regions of the world — plus, you’ll get to travel. Some programs will even pay for your expenses. Go Overseas lists a ton of volunteer teaching opportunities abroad.

3. Sell Your Lesson Plans Online

I love opportunities to leverage what you already have for passive income. You’ve already done the work. Why not make the most of it?

Take those lesson plans, worksheets and printables you created during the school year and upload them to a site like Teachers Pay Teachers. You will earn 60-85% of each sale of your education resources. And this is an opportunity that can continue to bring in additional income year-round without any additional work.

“I only sell digital products, so I don’t have to mail anything,” says Meredith O’Neill, a middle-school teacher who sells her resources on the site. “The sale and the transfer of my work happens automatically. The payment goes straight to my PayPal account after TPT takes its cut. It’s extremely easy once your store is created and your work is loaded.”

4. Work at a Summer Camp

If you love the great outdoors, consider getting a job at a summer camp.

Writer Amanda Simkin spent three summers working at a summer camp during her eight years of teaching. “Working at a summer camp is a great supplemental job because sometimes you just want to get away from the classroom (such as what you may encounter during summer school) and interact with kids in a more fun-focused and laid back way,” she explains.

Here’s how she recommends you find a job. “I learned about openings through word of mouth, but nowadays you can use social media, such as Park District websites, Facebook, even Craigslist to find openings,” she says. “Another great site to find education-related jobs is School Spring.” You can also check with your local YMCA, community organizations and churches.

Make Money on Local Tourism

If you live in a popular travel destination, there are a number of ways you can profit from the summer crowds.

5. Drive for Uber, Lyft or Sidecar

Some travelers prefer to walk or get a ride over renting a car. But they may still need a ride from the airport to their hotel, or home at night from a local hotspot. Rideshare drivers can earn up to $30 per hour during peak times, and you can log on to pick up work as you please.

Becoming a driver is a great option for those who want a flexible side job. “If you work more hours, you can make more money, but if you want to take a break and not drive for a few days, that’s OK, too,” says Harry Campbell, The Rideshare Guy.

6. Rent Out Your Driveway

No one wants to worry about feeding a meter while on vacation. If you live near an event center or stadium, rent out your driveway using sites and apps like JustPark or MonkeyParking — or go old-school and simply post a “Parking” sign in front of your house. You may only earn $20 per day, but $20 is $20!

7. Rent Extra Space in Your House

Got an extra bedroom? Rent out a room to travelers on Airbnb — or if you’ll be out of town for a weekend or longer, rent out your whole place.

8. Become a Local Tour Guide

If you know all of the hot spots and hidden gems in your city or neighborhood, consider becoming a local tour guide. It’s a great way to enjoy the weather, the scenery and good company (hopefully) while earning some extra cash.

Will You Work This Summer?

When it comes to summer jobs as a teacher, think beyond the usual babysitting and landscaping gigs. Look for opportunities to enjoy new experiences, share your expertise and meet new people, all while making extra money.

Your Turn: Teachers, do you work during the summer? What do you do?

Angie Nelson has been a virtual assistant and serial blogger since 2007, when she took her future into her own hands and found a way to escape the corporate cubicle farm. Visit The Work at Home Wife to learn about more opportunities to earn an income while keeping your personal freedom.

by Angie Nelson
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

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