This Magazine Wants a Virtual Writer-in-Residence — and It Will Pay $500

Writing fellowship
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Short of publishing your own book, opportunities to make money writing fiction are hard to come by, especially for new writers.

A writing fellowship can be a great career booster, offering invaluable experience, publication and resume fodder. Oh — and you usually get paid to write, too.

Usually a fellowship requires you to be a resident for a few months or a year, and often requires a college degree or enrollment.

But we found a virtual writing fellowship open to any writer over 18 years old that allows you to be a “writer-in-residence” and gain all of those benefits — without leaving your home.

Apply for the Kathy Fish Fellowship With SmokeLong Quarterly

“SmokeLong” is a quarterly online literary magazine dedicated to flash fiction (stories of 1,000 words or less). It’s accepting applications for a 2017 virtual writer-in-residence through its Kathy Fish Fellowship.

As the Fellowship winner, you would:

  • Be considered a “writer-in-residence.”
  • Have one piece of flash fiction published in each quarterly issue (March, June, September and December 2017).
  • Receive $500: $100 on announcement of the winner and $100 for each published piece throughout the year.
  • Work with “SmokeLong” staff and attend online writing workshops.

You’re eligible to apply if you:

  • Haven’t previously been published in “SmokeLong”
  • Haven’t previously published a chapbook or book-length work in any genre, including self-publishing or any works under contract
  • Are at least 18 years old

To apply: Submit your application via Submittable before September 15.

You’ll need to answer a few questions about yourself and include four samples of flash fiction, including at least one unpublished. The application is free with a $5 suggested donation to support future fellowship awards.

Your Turn: Have you seen any interesting virtual writing jobs lately?

Dana Sitar (@danasitar) is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. She’s written for Huffington Post, Entrepreneur.com, Writer’s Digest and more, attempting humor wherever it’s allowed (and sometimes where it’s not).