5 Slick Ways to Save Money on Amazon You Probably Don’t Know About

A man smiles while holding onto an Amazon box.
Carmen Mandato/The Penny Hoarder
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We’re all doing a lot more online shopping these days. New quarantine sweatpants? Add to Amazon cart. Noise-canceling headphones for your home office? Thanks, Amazon!

Here’s the thing though: You’re probably overpaying.

We always assume Amazon has the best price, but oftentimes, there are way better deals hiding out there. If you’re not tracking them down, you’re probably getting gouged.

Here’s how to stop overpaying…

1. Find Out if You’re Overpaying

Wikibuy tells you when you’re about to pay too much for an item. For example, you could save $30 on this TV.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you got an alert any time you’re shopping on Amazon and are about to get ripped off.

That’s exactly what a free service called Wikibuy does.

Wikibuy’s free alerts can be added to your browser. Before you check out, it’ll check other websites, including Walmart, Target, eBay and others to see if your item is available for cheaper. It will also show you coupon codes, set up price-drop alerts and even let you see the item’s price history.

Let’s say you’re shopping for a new TV. You’re ready to check out, and you assume you’re getting the best price. Here’s when Wikibuy will pop up and let you know if you’re about to overpay. It will even let you know if you can get it delivered sooner (see photo above).

So far, Wikibuy has saved users more than $70 million.

You can get started with Wikibuy in just a few minutes to see if you’re overpaying online.

2. Copy This Strategy To Get a $526 Refund

Chances are you do a lot of your shopping online. Whether it’s pet food, toilet paper or even gifts, you’re probably leaving money on the table.

A free website and browser extension called Rakuten has the hookup with just about every online store you shop, including Walmart and Target, which means it can give you a kickback every time you buy.

In fact, since Denver resident Colleen Rice started using Rakuten, it’s sent her checks in the mail totaling $526.44. For doing nothing. Seriously. Rice says she uses Rakuten for things she already has to buy, like rental cars and flights.

It takes less than 60 seconds to download the free extension, create a Rakuten account and start shopping. All you need is an email address, then you can immediately start shopping your go-to stores through the site.

Plus, if you use Rakuten to earn money back within the first 90 days of signing up, it’ll give you an extra $10 on the first check it sends you. Talk about money for nothing.

3. Get $225 in Amazon Gift Cards Just for Watching the News

A woman uses an Amazon gift card to shop.
Aileen Perilla/The Penny Hoarder

It’s been a historic year in news, and we’re all constantly refreshing for the latest updates. You probably know more than one news-junkie who fancies themselves an expert in respiratory illness or a political mastermind.

And research companies want to pay you to keep watching. You could add up to $225 a month in Amazon gift cards to your pocket by signing up for a free account with InboxDollars.

They’ll present you with short news clips to choose from every day, then ask you a few questions about them.You just have to answer honestly, and InboxDollars will continue to pay you every month.

This might sound too good to be true, but it’s already paid its users more than $56 million.

It takes about one minute to sign up, and start getting paid to watch the news.

4. Shop Amazon’s Outlet Store

A woman walks down the street with an Amazon box.
Tina Russell/The Penny Hoarder

Did you know Amazon has an outlet store? Seriously.

It works similarly to your traditional brick-and-mortar outlet stores; it stocks overstocked items and sells them at a discount.

You can find anything from pet supplies to clothing to electronics to grocery items.

5. Get $5 in Amazon Stock

Imagine if you had bought one share of Amazon for $18 when the stock first went public. Today, it would be worth more than $20,000 — despite all the ups and downs in the stock market.

But if you work for a living and don’t happen to have millions of dollars lying around, that can sound totally out of reach.

That’s why a lot of people use the app Stash. They’ll give you $5 of stock in Amazon (or another company of your choice) just for opening an account. 

The best part? When these companies profit, so can you. Some companies even send you a check every quarter for your share of the profits, called dividends.

How to claim your free bonus: It takes just a couple of minutes to sign up and get your bonus stock — you may even just get a share of the “next Amazon.”

With Stash, all your investments are protected by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) — that’s industry talk for, “Your money’s safe.”2

1Not all stocks pay out dividends, and there is no guarantee that dividends will be paid each year.

2To note, SIPC coverage does not insure against the potential loss of market value.

For Securities priced over $1,000, purchase of fractional shares starts at $0.05.

*Offer is subject to Promotion Terms and Conditions. To be eligible to participate in this Promotion and receive the bonus, you must successfully open an individual brokerage account in good standing, link a funding account to your Invest account AND deposit $5.00 into your Invest account.

Paid non-client endorsement. See Apple App Store and Google Play reviews. View important disclosures.

Investment advisory services offered by Stash Investments LLC, an SEC registered investment adviser. This material has been distributed for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended as investment, legal, accounting, or tax advice. Investing involves risk. 


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